Wanting to learn to shoot a gun

Topic by Hector

Hector

Home Forums Cool S~~~ & Fun Stuff Wanting to learn to shoot a gun

This topic contains 33 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by ~BS  ~BS 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 14 posts - 21 through 34 (of 34 total)
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  • #663320
    +1
    Old Buck
    Old Buck
    Participant
    1189

    take a look at the Astra A-75, A-80, CZ-75. The Beretta is OK but I like these others better.

    I loved the CZ-75 & varients the most. Fit the best in the hand.

    But the Glock was a little more accurate.

    I second the motion to try a few out when you are at the range.

    Also look at how easy it is for you to field strip (basic disassembly for cleaning: remove mag, release slide, pull the barrel & recoil spring).

    If a man can control his mind he can find the way to Enlightenment, and all wisdom and virtue will naturally come to him.

    #663337
    +1
    SoylentGeneration
    SoylentGeneration
    Participant
    2224

    I personally carry the CZ 75 compact. I love it. One of my favorite hanguns. My favorites are the Colt1911, Browning Hi Power, CZ75, and Smith and Wesson 686.

    You may like the more modern polymer wonders though, Glocks, Sig Sauer, Steyer, Smith and Wesson M&P line, ect. There is such a wide selection out there. If nothing else it will be fun. There are many good selections out there.

    "We will meet in the place where there is no darkness" 1984

    #663706
    +1
    Xanthine
    xanthine
    Participant
    3288

    Go to the gun store, look at a bunch of them. See how they all feel in your hand. Ask questions. Eventually you will know when you find the right one for you. No one else can do that but you.

    I think you’ve made an excellent decision btw. My first gun was a Springfield xd9 9mm, i was pretty much in the exact position as you. 2 years later i have a variety of different guns and a lot more experience.

    If you only ever get one gun, a good 9mm pistol is one of the best choices you can possibly make. Very capable round, yet cheap and widely available, and the gun itself is versatile enough to be used for almost any defensive scenario. Only thing i would add is a good rifle and shotgun, everything after that is just a bonus.

    #666445
    Delta2Foxtrot
    Delta2Foxtrot
    Participant
    3

    That’s not true! It actually works very well in most situations. You just have to be extra cautious about miss fire…

    #666744
    Hector
    Hector
    Participant
    879

    Thanks everyone for your replies.

    Tomorrow is G day, looking forward to it. After the 2 hour course, I’m heading to a armory to look at a used Beretta 92s which is at less than €300.

    I’ll keep you updated on progress.

    Cheers,
    H

    #674111
    +2
    Hector
    Hector
    Participant
    879

    Ok, here’s my update!

    The class lasted 2.5 hours. We were 8 people in total, with half men, half women. We were provided the guns by the instructors / shooting range.

    The males: myself, my brother, a guy about 50 and a young guy about to go in the army who wanted to shoot before going.

    My brother took a Sig Sauer P226, I took at Beretta M9A3, the 50 year old guy had his own Beretta. The young kid took a striker fire Glock 17. So aside from the young kid, we all took double/single action hammer actuated guns. My brother and I requested the hammer actuated as we wanted to learn the slightly more complicated system.

    The females: ranged from 40 to 50+ (ie: all post wall). One had used hunting rifles wither her husband. They all were provided striker fire guns similar to a Glock. I don’t think they knew the difference.

    All in all, it was a great 2.5 hours. I learned how to handle, load, load, clear, fire etc. All the safety measures you needed to do. WE started at 3m, then 5m then 7m. My first shot was dead in the bulls-eye (the signts on the M9A3 are great!) but later groupings were all over the shop (target). I hadn’t eaten anything before the course, a BIG mistake.

    All in all, the experience was excellent. The same day I purchased a Beretta 92s. I’ve been back to the shooting range twice again so far, shooting my Beretta, and today I purchased a Walther P1.

    I’m also signed up for their more advanced course later next month. Can’t wait!!!

    #682011
    +1
    Hermit
    Hermit
    Participant
    1981

    Hector, sounds like you are enjoying learning how to handle your handgun. I like all kinds of guns, but a handgun is challenging and very fun once you learn how to shoot it. I’ve had handguns most of my life, but never got enough practice until recently. I’ve spent hundreds of dollars and have gone through thousands of rounds and am very happy to say that I am now consistently hitting the target at longer distances and my rapid fire aim has also improved.

    I have four handguns: .44 magnum revolver, .38 Special revolver, 10mm semi-auto and a 1911, .45 ACP semi-auto. Lately I’ve been shooting the .45 the most, but I’ve noticed that consistent practice with any handgun has improved my aim with all handguns. I was never able to hit anything with my little .38 Special even at close range, but now I can hit the target at 25 yards.

    Shooting handguns is fun, but there are so many variables involved to be accurate: Stance, grip, breathing, sight picture, mindset……. I have found that when I am doing everything properly, it almost seems very easy to hit on target and because of that, I start to lose my concentration and begin to rush the shot. Once I see what is happening, I can now quickly get back into the right frame of mind and start shooting well again.

    Have fun and be safe.

    The evil in women’s hearts leaves them no moral bounds as to inhibit them from descending to the lowest levels of darkness to acquire their self entitled desires.

    #682711
    +1
    ~BS
    ~BS
    Participant
    3160

    I’d start slow, take the class first, and hopefully thye’ll let you try out various different guns.

    It’s also super easy to blow any sort of budget you have on guns, so start slow and carefully.

    i’m not sure what gun prices are like where you’re at. Euros convert to dollars at around $425. I think it’s easier to shoot a full size auto than it is to shoot a compact (most compacts are cheaper). And it’s for self defense.

    I’d recommend a cz-75. They come with safeties if you desire, but personally, I’m not a fan of safeties. cz-75 is one of the easiest and natural pointing handguns there is to shoot IMO. It’s a heavier handgun, so it keeps the recoil down and the sights on target, makes it easier for newer shooters. The quality of the gun used to be a pretty well kept secret in the US, but more and more people are recognizing how good they are. Just a quick googled example, CZs generally dominate competitions that they’re eligible:

    PRODUCTION Division (132 shooters)
    #1ROBIN ŠEBO, CZ SHOOTING TEAM 100 %
    #2MARIA GUSHCHINA, CZ SHOOTING TEAM 95,02 %
    #3MICHAL ŠTĚPÁN, CZ SHOOTING TEAM 93,10 %

    https://www.gunsweek.com/en/pistols/news/cz-shadow-2-pistol-wins-ipsc-open-2016-munich

    One common misconception is that the smaller handguns are easier to use. The opposite is true, the smaller the gun, the shorter the barrel, the harder it is to shoot accurately, and the greater the recoil. For your first gun, you want a full sized steel gun.

    Shoot cheap ammo for practice, buy better ammo for self defense purposes.

    Shoot 9mm. Pricewise, it’ll be the cheapest, aside from 22lr. Cheaper ammo allows you to practice more.

    "He didn't marry until now, so he won't ever do it. Think about it, why would a man like him ever marry? It's too late to catch him. " ~some cunt

    #682907
    +2
    Hector
    Hector
    Participant
    879

    @hermit thanks for the post. Yes, I am enjoying learning how to properly use a hand-gun. At the beginning, my shots were all over the place (first time I had ever fired a hand gun of any calibre). Now, after 5 visits the the range and 500 rounds shot, I’m getting a little better. There are always one or two “off target” shots, but most are grouped within the 7, and half of those are within the 4 (with a few 10s). As the instructor said, that means you would hit the person at least somewhere in their chest/torso, if not dead centre.

    @~BS Thanks for the info! The intro class allowed us to pick the sort of gun we wanted. I choose the M9A3 as it was big enough for my hands (I have very large hands). I bought the Beretta 92s as it was in my price range and was large enough. Plus, I like the safety-dec~~~er in combination with the double/single action. A few weeks ago my brother and I went to the range and rented 4 different guns, the M9A3 again, a Walther PPQ (striker fire), a Sphinx SDP Compact and a CZ Shadow 2.

    I put the M9A3 in first place (I’m biased as I own a Beretta and it’s the first handgun I ever shot, so it’s comfortable)

    The CZ comes in second place. It’s fantastic quality, but the trigger required NO force to fire / there is almost no take-up (unlike the Beretta), it caught me off guard after the M9A3. I could get used to it though.

    Sphinx SDP Compact comes in 3rd. It’s a nice gun, but it had been beaten to hell by the people who rented it before me. As the company folded due to bad management in 2013, parts will be hard to get here in Europe.

    Walther PPQ comes in 4th, namely because I had several times when I pulled the trigger but it didn’t fire, even after ejecting the unspent round, it wouldn’t fire the next one. I ejected the mag, put the bullets back in the mag, reinserted it, ran the slide to load and it fired. To me, it seemed as if this one either had been shot too much, or was in need of a cleaning / service or it didn’t like the Geco rounds or something.

    Currently I’ve run MagTech 9mm, MagTech Clean Range 9mm (this sucked) and Geco 9mm in my 92s, it prefers/feels best with the Geco. I’m currently buying in single boxes at +/- €19 the box of 50. I can get 1000 rounds for about €240, which is what I’ll soon (that’s 24 centimes the shot).

    In the The MagTech ejects the spent cartridges all over the place (on my arm/head mostly). The Geco always ejects back and away from my body, something with the design of the shell casing I’m guessing.

    Cheers guys, thanks again.

    H

    #683011
    +1
    ~BS
    ~BS
    Participant
    3160

    ^

    With larger hands, you definitely want one of the full sized guns. I’m sure you realized it already, but the compacts are going to be pretty uncomfortable for you to grip and shoot well. Taking a proper grip, you’ll might have issues like your fingers are up over the trigger guard, slide might be biting into your hand when you fire.

    Sounds like the PPQ was in desperate need of a detail strip and cleaning.

    But yeah, ammo is best bought in bulk for pricing. Good to buy by the box at first to figure out what ammo your gun likes. Make sure to pick up some good hollowpoints for defense, which can be a lot more expensive than the range ammo, which is FMJ, and not in the same class when it comes to being able to stop an attacker.

    RE Ejection, try taking a tighter grip on the handgun the next time you fire. It could be that ammo has a harder recoil, and as a new shooter, you’re “limp wristing” the gun. This causes the gun to rotate slightly when you fire, ejecting the casings more upwards (hitting yourself) instead of outwards. Try having other shooters try shoot and see if they have the same problem. If other shooters having the same issue, it might be the ammo.

    "He didn't marry until now, so he won't ever do it. Think about it, why would a man like him ever marry? It's too late to catch him. " ~some cunt

    #684920
    Hector
    Hector
    Participant
    879

    @~BS thanks, I’ll give that a try. My brother notices the same thing with the MagTech and the Gecco using the same model gun (but not the same gun).

    re: hollow-point, I’ll check next time I’m at the gun smith’s (he has the best price on Ammo, not the gun stores..)

    #684933
    +2
    XSDBS
    XSDBS
    Participant
    3081

    I would like to mention the importance of hearing/ear protection.
    I assume that the instructor/classes are providing ear muffs and or foam ear plugs.

    Investing in a quality set of ear muffs is very important.
    Try to find the highest noise reduction rating (NRR) you can,
    which can range from 22db all the way up to 31db.
    The higher the number, the better hearing protection.

    #684962
    Hector
    Hector
    Participant
    879

    @xsdbs Yep, I already did that before going on the first day. Some 3M ear protectors rated at 25db, as well as backup foam ear plugs.

    #685498
    +1
    ~BS
    ~BS
    Participant
    3160

    @xsdbs Yep, I already did that before going on the first day. Some 3M ear protectors rated at 25db, as well as backup foam ear plugs.

    Yeah, I usually wear both at the same time. Indoor and outdoor ranges can be really loud, and while you’re shooting 9mm, you don’t have control over what the guy next to you is shooting. He could be shooting a ported .500 S&W. Ported guns are cool for the guy shooting them cause they reduce recoil, but not so much fun for the guys next to him.

    "He didn't marry until now, so he won't ever do it. Think about it, why would a man like him ever marry? It's too late to catch him. " ~some cunt

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